7 electrical measuring instruments, electric engines
Оценка 4.8

7 electrical measuring instruments, electric engines

Оценка 4.8
docx
07.05.2020
7 electrical measuring instruments, electric engines
7 electrical measuring instruments, electric engines.docx

 

GROUP 1: Building an electric motor.

1.      Push a short knitting needle through a large cork.

2.      Push 2 pins in one end of the cork as shown, to make a simple commutator.

3.      Now wind round the cork about 30 turns of thin insulated copper wire, starting of one pin and finishing at the other. It helps if you can cut channels in the cork to take the wire.

4.      Scrape the insulation off the ends of the wire (using emery paper or a knife). Wrap each end of the wire round a pi, making good electrical contact.

5.      Push 2 pairs of long pairs into a baseboard to support the axle at each end.

6.      Strip the insulation from the ends of 2 wires and use drawing pins to hold them in position so that they just touch the commutator.

7.      Use plasticine to support magnets on each side of the coil (with opposite poles facing).

8.      Connect the wires to a 2 V or 4 V supply and give the coil a flick to start it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GROUP 2: How to Build a Simple Electric Motor

Part 1: Winding the Coil.

1.      Tape together four pencils. Tape the pencils in a two by two cluster. This will give you something solid to wrap your coil around. You can substitute the pencils for a cylinder that’s roughly half an inch in diameter.

 

 

 

2.      Wrap wire around the pencils. Once you have the pencils taped or find a suitable cylinder, begin wrapping your wire around it tightly. Start in the middle of the wire and wrap the coil fifteen times toward one end and fifteen times toward the other. Once you have finished wrapping the coil, remove the pencils from the middle. This will leave you with two loose leads at either end of the coil.

 

3.      Loop the loose ends around the coil. Wrap the loose ends around either side of the coil three or four times. This will help keep the coil wound tightly. Point the remaining loose ends straight out away from the coil.

 

Part 2: Connecting the Battery.

1.      Secure the battery. 

Use tape or clay to hold the battery in place on a flat surface like a tabletop or desk. This will allow you to connect it to the coil without having to hold it with your hands. Make sure the battery is laying on its side so that you can easily reach both terminals.

 

2.      Strip the ends of the coil wire. Use wire strippers to remove the insulation on either end of the wire, but only one half of the insulation, such that the bare wire will be connected to the circuit only half the time. These leads will connect to the battery and allow current to flow through the coil. If you sand the wire all the way around, the wire will heat up or move back and forth, and the motor will not work. 

 

 

 

 

3.      Slide each end through the eye of a needle. A needle makes the perfect holder for the wire leads. Insert each end into the eye of a separate needle. You can also bend two paper clips (one for each side) to make a holder.

 

 

4.      Tape the needles to the battery terminals. Once you have the wire in both needles, it’s time to hook your wire up to the battery. Tape one needle to the positive side of the battery (marked with a “+”). Tape the other needle to the negative side of the battery (marked with a “-”).

 

Part 3: Introducing the Magnet

1.      Bring a magnet close to the coil. Once a current is flowing through the coil, it can interact with a magnet. Either hold the magnet close to the coil, or tape it to the battery right underneath the coil. The closer the magnet is to the coil the stronger it will interact.

2.      Spin the coil. See what happens when you spin the coil. Depending on the direction the current is flowing and the side of the magnet that is interacting with the coil, the coil may continue to spin or may not. If the coil does not keep spinning, try spinning the other direction.

3.      Experiment with different methods. Different variations will give you different results. The coil may spin faster, slower, or not at all if you change something. Try moving the magnet closer to or further from the coil, pick a stronger or weaker magnet, or use the other side of the magnet. These variations are a fun way to understand the forces in an electric motor.

 

 

 

 


 

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GROUP 1: Building an electric motor

GROUP 1: Building an electric motor

GROUP 2: How to Build a Simple

GROUP 2: How to Build a Simple

Part 2: Connecting the Battery

Part 2: Connecting the Battery

Tape the needles to the battery terminals

Tape the needles to the battery terminals

Experiment with different methods

Experiment with different methods
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